Market Overview

The U.S. is BC’s largest export market for lumber and value-added products. The U.S. remains the leading consumer of BC forest products, including lumber and mass timber, as well as a full range of value-added products, such as doors, windows, joinery and finishings, and furniture

With the market moving toward multi-family living, there is growing potential to expand the use of wood into multi-family/multi-storey construction, as well as into non-residential applications (commercial, institutional, recreational and educational).

Opportunities for the BC value-added sector also exist in resort homes, log and timber frame structures, prefabricated housing, cabinetry, shakes and shingles, millwork and finishing, and landscaping and outdoor living.

Photo: The Canyons, Portland, Oregon | Credit: Marcus Kauffman, Oregon Department of Forestry

Key Stats

#

0

global market for BC forest products

0

%
of BC’s value-added products are destined for the U.S. market

0

%
of BC lumber exports go to the U.S. (by volume)

Why the United States?

  • The largest market for BC lumber and value-added products
  • Robust repair and remodelling sector
  • Shared interest in advancing wood construction technologies
Photo: TV home-renovation hosts Colin McAllister and Justin Ryan in front of the Real Cedar bunkie, Haliburton, Ontario | Credit: Western Red Cedar Lumber Association

Market Priorities

  • Promote wood use in multi-family and non-residential sectors
  • Target mass timber and value-added product opportunities, including engineered and remanufactured wood, millwork, cabinets, furniture, prefab, log home and timber-frame housing
  • Provide technical advice and education to help architects, builders and developers capitalize on advanced wood technologies and systems, including mass timber and wood-concrete-steel hybrid solutions.
Photo: 1430 Q Street in Sacramento, California | Credit: Greg Folkins

Strategic Approach

FII’s efforts in the U.S. are focused on supporting industry partner-led programming to expand the use of wood in priority segments. A combination of promotion, technical support and education programs have built capacity and interest with developers, contractors and building and design professionals. Value-added programs target the growing repair and remodelling sector as well as the mid-rise, hybrid and mass timber construction markets.

Photo: The 2020 International Builders Show (IBS) | Credit: BC Wood

Featured Projects

Colin and Justin in front of the Real Cedar bunkie, Haliburton, Ontario

Colin and Justin: Great Canadian Cottage

Colin and Justin in front of the Real Cedar bunkie, Haliburton, Ontario

TV home-renovation hosts Colin McAllister and Justin Ryan collaborated with the WRCLA to feature in a six-part online video series. Available on the Real Cedar YouTube Channel and a dedicated landing page on realcedar.com, Colin and Justin: The House that Cedar Fixed, covers why the designers chose western red cedar to transform a dated, lakefront cottage and features projects including a 2,500 sq. ft. 2×6 cedar wrap-around deck, a cedar bunkhouse and a timber-frame sunroom, among others.

Colin and Justin are well known in the United Kingdom and Canada for their TV series, newspaper columns on home renovations and regular appearances on talk shows. WRCLA’s partnership with the home renovators is creating opportunities to showcase western red cedar, expand audience reach and drive traffic to realcedar.com.

The Canyons, Portland, Oregon | Photo: Marcus Kauffman, Oregon Department of Forestry

A cost-competitive, innovative solution

The Canyons, Portland, Oregon | Photo: Marcus Kauffman, Oregon Department of Forestry

WoodWorks continues to see a rise in the number of wood-hybrid projects combining light wood-frame and mass timber construction to reduce costs while delivering on project design goals.

The Canyons, a 70-unit, 110,000 sq. ft. assisted living building in Portland, Oregon is an example of this innovation. Assisted living facilities are subject to different code requirements than apartment buildings, and the team chose a hybrid structure that included cross-laminated timber (CLT) and light wood-frame construction for the top four storeys, a post-tension concrete slab for the second floor and CLT with steel connectors for the atrium.

1430 Q Street in Sacramento, California was completed through an alternate means process | Photos: Greg Folkins

6-over-2 = new opportunities

1430 Q Street in Sacramento, California was completed through an alternate means process | Photos: Greg Folkins

An important part of WoodWorks’ mandate is helping project teams design larger and taller light wood-frame buildings. Hybrid projects, which include multiple storeys of wood over a concrete podium, offer a great opportunity to demonstrate how this can be achieved.

To educate more designers on hybrid construction, WoodWorks invited a local building official and a code consultant to present on 6-over-2 buildings at a Wood Design Symposium they were hosting in Seattle. This approach would give designers an eight-storey option that is mostly wood, as opposed to an entirely non-wood (concrete/steel) alternative. Seattle is currently the only U.S. jurisdiction allowing six storeys of residential wood construction (instead of five) over multiple storeys of concrete without special approval.

mass timber growth

Mass timber growth

mass timber growth

Mass timber continues to gain acceptance across the U.S. As of June 2020, 921 multi-family, commercial or institutional mass timber projects had been constructed or were in design in all 50 states. This total includes modern mass timber and post-and-beam structures built since 2013. About half of requests to WoodWorks for advice and assistance are in the low-rise commercial and assembly category.